Ossining Team Does The Robot

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Members of the Ossining High School Robotics Club pose with their robot.
Members of the Ossining High School Robotics Club pose with their robot. Photo Credit: Sam Barron
The Ossining High School Robotics Club has built a robot to throw a ball.
The Ossining High School Robotics Club has built a robot to throw a ball. Photo Credit: Sam Barron

OSSINING, N.Y. -- There is a robot lurking the halls of Ossining High School.

The Ossining Robotics Club will be competing this weekend at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in Manhattan against high schools throughout the country and even some from overseas.

This year, the club, which raises its own money to design and build the robot in six weeks, which is required to pick up a ball and toss it. 

"We have to use real life and engineering skills," Sean D'Atorre, club president, said. "We have so many ideas for how to get it to work."

D'Attore said many in the club are going to college to be engineers and the group has been working after school until 8 p.m. to get the robot to function.

"It takes a lot out of you," D'Attore said. "It's a lot of work. It's very challenging."

This is the third year for the robotics competition and D'Attore feels the group is coming into its own.

"We've built a good robot," D'Attore said. "We're very proud of what we've done."

While the group wants to win, Daniel Scanteiann said it is all about the journey and not the destination. The  group even got to work with IBM at its Yorktown campus when developing the robot.

"It was amazing seeing what they could do," Scanteiann said.

Scanteiann and D'Attore said they enjoy the robot competition, getting to meet like minded individuals and see what other people are building.

"You get to show what you built," D'attore said.

Tom Criscione said it has been a lot of fun building the robot.

"It's such a great experience," Criscione said. "We just started with a big pile of metal. It's a lot of long nights, but you really develop a bond with these people. I wouldn't trade it for anything."

Anthony Briones said being in the club has helped him develop social skills, problem solving skills, and educational skills.

"I'll never forget this great experience," Briones said. 

Mark Scinta, a faculty adviser, said it he has enjoyed working with the kids to build the robot.

"It's been tough and challenging," Scinta said. "There is a lot we've had to overcome. It's great seeing it all come together."

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