Ossining Sculptures Cap Off Bicentennial

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Village of Ossining sculpture “Double Arch” by Gary Orlinsky.
Village of Ossining sculpture “Double Arch” by Gary Orlinsky. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Craig Cooper
Sculptor David Boyajian with “Dancing Milkweed III.” Photo by: Craig Cooper
Sculptor David Boyajian with “Dancing Milkweed III.” Photo by: Craig Cooper Photo Credit: Courtesy of Craig Cooper
Village of Ossining sculpture “Let’s Roll” by James Havens
Village of Ossining sculpture “Let’s Roll” by James Havens Photo Credit: Courtesy of Craig Cooper

OSSINING, N.Y. -- 2013 has been the year of Ossining.

The village, which celebrated its bicentennial, has made three sculptures from its Ossining in 3D exhibit permanent fixtures in the village.

The sculptures are James Havens' "Let's Roll," David Boyajian's "Dancing Milkweed III" and Gary Orlinksky's "Double Arch." The sculptures were selected from 25 pieces displayed this year.

“This bicentennial exhibit reflected the village itself, which, as it now accelerates in its renaissance, has become an exciting place for contemporary living in historic surroundings,” said Mayor Bill Hanauer. “The three sculptures, which will remain to forever grace the village, will remind future generations of our present period of growth."

Havens used stainless steel, plate, shaft and gear to construct "Let's Roll," located at the triangle at Main Street and Church Street.

“I intend that my sculptures should contain enough information that the viewer is not confused or mystified by the artist’s intent,” said Havens. “I wish to be considered a good journeyman ironworker who creates enduring sculptures that speak to the highest aspirations of the human spirit.”

“Let’s Roll” was purchased following a successful crowd-funding campaign initiated by the village before the sculpture exhibit ended. Donations were made largely by individuals in the community.

“Dancing Milkweed III” is in front of village hall. Like “Let’s Roll,” the sculpture was paid for with crowd-funding donations supplemented by funds raised by the Bicentennial Committee.

“It is a poetic narrative depicting the scattering of seed forms in nature,” says Boyajian, who fabricated “Dancing Milkweed III” out of steel. “Seeds are designed to travel like people do. And during times of great conflict or natural disaster or personal timing, new options become available and things move."

Orlinsky was inspired by the village for "Double Arch". His sculpture was made from wood, paint and sapling and he donated his sculpture to the village. The sculpture is located at the Caputo Community Center.

“Ossining’s treasures are its buildings, its nature and its people,” said George Camp, Bicentennial Committee Chairman. “I’m so pleased that ‘Ossining in 3D’ was such an overwhelming success. It brought everyone together to celebrate what an amazing community we have in Ossining.”

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