Briarcliff's Cancer Spinathon Raises $4,000

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Briarcliff Manor resident Jordana Cohen, 13, gives a thumbs up Saturday during the first Spinathon for Pediatric Cancer. Jordana organized the Spinathon, which helped raise $4,000 for the Pediatric Cancer Foundation. Photo Credit: Nathan Bruttell
Barry Coleman, owner and instructor of SpinSational Fitness Center, rides with dozens of sponsors during Briarcliff Manor's Spinathon for Pediatric Cancer Saturday. Photo Credit: Nathan Bruttell
Riders get some tips from SpinSational Owner Barry Coleman Saturday during Briarcliff Manor's Spinathon for Pediatric Cancer. Photo Credit: Photo Courtesy Jordana Cohen

BRIARCLIFF MANOR, N.Y. – When 13-year-old Jordana Cohen came up with the idea for Briarcliff Manor’s first Spinathon for Pediatric Cancer, she wanted it to be big. But she had no idea she could help raise more than $4,000. 

More than a hundred people from around Westchester came to spin at SpinSational Fitness Studio Saturday for the first Spin for the Pediatric Cancer Foundation. Jordana said donations have exceeded $4,000 and more pledges are still coming in.

“I didn’t think I’d have to be turning people away and the entire day has just been amazing,” she said Saturday. “This was a great turnout and I definitely want to do it again next year.”

The Pediatric Cancer Club cancelled its “bikeathon” through the Bronx River Parkway this year due to lack of funding, so Jordana decided to organize the Spinathon as a way to keep the spirit of the event going. Jordana, who is also the founder and president of the Pediatric Cancer Club of Briarcliff Manor, called the day a “great success."

Jordana’s mother Susan Cohen said she was “incredibly impressed” with the response from people Saturday.

“The energy was great and the support has been amazing,” Susan Cohen said.

Briarcliff resident and supporter Dale Sirota said it was important to attend the event.

“Jordana has really taken this to the next generation and really run with it,” Sirota said. “She’s really an inspiration to all of the kids at the school.”

Ellen Kilman said it meant a lot to her but also to dozens of kids who showed up Saturday to support the event.

“I think the best thing about it is opening younger kids’ eyes to the fact that not everyone is as fortunate,” Kilman said. “Unfortunately though, they do know kids who have cancer and who have perished because of it. So this is their way to give back and hopefully find a cure.”

For 13-year-old Noah Kamen, he decided to help out at the event after losing a friend to pediatric cancer last year.

“My friend Nick passed away from brain cancer and I felt like I wanted to do something about it,” Noah said. “We had so many people come out and help raise money and it’s great to see.” 

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